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Mobile orthodontic treatment

This is the most common type of orthodontic appliance in use today.

Fixed braces consist of square brackets attached to each tooth, with a wire running through them, which gradually moves your teeth into the correct position. The wire is held in place by small coloured loops called modules, or colours.

The length of treatment with fixed braces varies but is typically around 18 to 24 months.

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Orthodontics

Orthodontics is the branch of dentistry that corrects teeth and jaws that are positioned improperly. Crooked teeth and teeth that do not fit together correctly are harder to keep clean, are at risk of being lost early due to tooth decay and periodontal disease, and cause extra stress on the chewing muscles that can lead to headaches, TMJ syndrome and neck, shoulder and back pain. Teeth that are crooked or not in the right place can also detract from one's appearance.

The benefits of orthodontic treatment include a healthier mouth, a more pleasing appearance, and teeth that are more likely to last a lifetime.

How do I Know if I Need Orthodontics?

Only your dentist or orthodontist can determine whether you can benefit from orthodontics. Based on diagnostic tools that include a full medical and dental health history, a clinical exam, plaster models of your teeth, and special X-rays and photographs, an orthodontist or dentist can decide whether orthodontics are recommended, and develop a treatment plan that's right for you.

If you have any of the following, you may be a candidate for orthodontic treatment:

Overbite, sometimes called "buck teeth" - where the upper front teeth lie too far forward (stick out) over the lower teeth

Underbite - a "bulldog" appearance where the lower teeth are too far forward or the upper teeth too far back

Crossbite - when the upper teeth do not come down slightly in front of the lower teeth when biting together normally

Open bite - space between the biting surfaces of the front and/or side teeth when the back teeth bite together

Misplaced midline - when the center of your upper front teeth does not line up with the center of your lower front teeth

Spacing - gaps, or spaces, between the teeth as a result of missing teeth or teeth that do not "fill up" the mouth

Crowding - when there are too many teeth for the dental ridge to accommodate

How Does Orthodontic Treatment Work?

Many different types of appliances, both fixed and removable, are used to help move teeth, retrain muscles and affect the growth of the jaws. These appliances work by placing gentle pressure on the teeth and jaws. The severity of your problem will determine which orthodontic approach is likely to be the most effective.

Fixed appliances include:

Braces - the most common fixed appliances, braces consist of bands, wires and/or brackets. Bands are fixed around the teeth or tooth and used as anchors for the appliance, while brackets are most often bonded to the front of the tooth. Arch wires are passed through the brackets and attached to the bands. Tightening the arch wire puts tension on the teeth, gradually moving them to their proper position. Braces are usually adjusted monthly to bring about the desired results, which may be achieved within a few months to a few years. Today's braces are smaller, lighter and show far less metal than in the past. They come in bright colors for kids as well as clear styles preferred by many adults.

Special fixed appliances - used to control thumb sucking or tongue thrusting, these appliances are attached to the teeth by bands. Because they are very uncomfortable during meals, they should be used only as a last resort.

Fixed space maintainers - if a baby tooth is lost prematurely, a space maintainer is used to keep the space open until the permanent tooth erupts. A band is attached to the tooth next to the empty space, and a wire is extended to the tooth on the other side of the space.

Removable appliances include:

Aligners - an alternative to traditional braces for adults, serial aligners are being used by an increasing number of orthodontists to move teeth in the same way that fixed appliances work, only without metal wires and brackets. Aligners are virtually invisible and are removed for eating, brushing and flossing.

Removable space maintainers - these devices serve the same function as fixed space maintainers. They're made with an acrylic base that fits over the jaw, and have plastic or wire branches between specific teeth to keep the space between them open.

Jaw repositioning appliances - also called splints, these devices are worn on either the top or lower jaw, and help train the jaw to close in a more favorable position. They may be used for temporomandibular joint disorders (TMJ).

Lip and cheek bumpers - these are designed to keep the lips or cheeks away from the teeth. Lip and cheek muscles can exert pressure on the teeth, and these bumpers help relieve that pressure.

Palatal expander - a device used to widen the arch of the upper jaw. It is a plastic plate that fits over the roof of the mouth. Outward pressure applied to the plate by screws force the joints in the bones of the palate to open lengthwise, widening the palatal area.

Removable retainers - worn on the roof of the mouth, these devices prevent shifting of the teeth to their previous position. They can also be modified and used to prevent thumb sucking.

Headgear - with this device, a strap is placed around the back of the head and attached to a metal wire in front, or face bow. Headgear slows the growth of the upper jaw, and holds the back teeth where they are while the front teeth are pulled back.

Fixed orthodontic treatment

These customized appliances, made in the dental laboratory based on a previously made impression of the dental arches, correct simple or medium dental anomalies, by exerting controlled pressure on teeth and jawbones

Mobile appliances are recommended to children with the request of being worn during both day and night, except for meals and tooth brushing. They are used for a short period, as part of a broader treatment plan.

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Orthodontics for Children

It's best for the orthodontist to see children by age 7 to advise if orthodontic treatment is required and the best time for that patient to be treated. The first permanent molars and incisors have usually come in by that time and crossbites, crowding and other problems can be evaluated.

When treatment is begun early, the orthodontist can guide incoming permanent teeth. Early treatment can also regulate the width of the upper and lower dental arches, gain space for permanent teeth, avoid the need for permanent tooth extractions, reduce likelihood of impacted permanent teeth, correct thumb-sucking, and eliminate abnormal swallowing or speech problems. In other words, early treatment can simplify later treatment.

Orthodontics for Adults

Orthodontic treatment can be successful at any age and adults especially appreciate the benefits of a beautiful smile. One of every five patients in orthodontic treatment is over 21. Jaw surgery is more often required for adult orthodontic patients because their jaws are not growing. Adults also may have experienced some breakdown or loss of their teeth and bone that supports the teeth and may require periodontal treatment before, during, and/or after orthodontic treatment. Bone loss can also limit the amount and direction of tooth movement that is advisable.

Orthodontic Dictionary

Parts of Braces

Appliance: Anything your orthodontist attaches to your teeth which moves your teeth or changes the shape of your jaw.

Archwire: The metal wire that acts as a track to guide your teeth along as they move. It is changed periodically throughout treatment as your teeth move to their new positions.

Band: A metal ring that is cemented to your tooth, going completely around it. Bands provide a way to attach brackets to your teeth.

Bond: The seal created by orthodontic cement that holds your appliances in place.

Bracket: A metal or ceramic part cemented ("bonded") to your tooth that holds your archwire in place.

Coil Spring: A spring that fits between your brackets and over your archwire to open space between your teeth.

Elastic (Rubber Band): A small rubber band that is hooked between different points on your appliance to provide pressure to move your teeth to their new position.

Elastic Tie: The tiny rubber band that fits around your bracket to hold the archwire in place. They come in a variety of colors.

Headgear: Headgear uses an external wire apparatus known as a facebow to gently guide the growth of your face and jaw by moving your teeth into proper position. The force is applied to the facebow by a spring-loaded neck strap or head strap. The straps have a safety release that disconnects if the facebow is pulled or snagged.

Headgear Tube: A round, hollow attachment on your back bands. The inner bow of your headgear fits into it.

Hook: A welded or removable arm to which elastics are attached.

Ligature: A thin wire that holds your archwire into your bracket.

Lip Bumper: A lip bumper is an archwire attached to a molded piece of plastic. The lip bumper holds back the molars on your lower jaw to provide more space for your other teeth.

Mouthguard: A device that protects your mouth from injury when you participate in sports or rigorous activities.

Palatal Expander: A device that makes your upper jaw wider.

Retainer: An appliance that is worn after your braces are removed, the retainer attaches to your upper and/or lower teeth to hold them in place. Some retainers are removable, while others are bonded to the tongue-side of several teeth.

Separator or Spacer: A small rubber ring that creates space between your teeth before the bands are attached.

Tie Wire: A fine wire that is twisted around your bracket to hold the archwire in place.

Wax: Wax is used to stop your braces from irritating your lips.

Orthodontic Procedures

Banding: The process of fitting and cementing orthodontic bands to your teeth.

Bonding: The process of attaching brackets to your teeth using special orthodontic cement.

Cephalometric X-ray: An x-ray of your head which shows the relative positions and growth of the face, jaws, and teeth.

Consultation: A meeting with your orthodontist to discuss a treatment plan.

Debanding: The process of removing cemented orthodontic bands from your teeth.

Debonding: The process of removing cemented orthodontic brackets from your teeth.

Impressions: The process of making a model of your teeth by biting into a soft material that hardens into a mold of your teeth. Your orthodontist will use these impressions to prepare your treatment plan.

Invisalign®: An alternative to traditional braces, Invisalign straightens your teeth with a series of clear custom-molded aligners. Invisalign can correct some, but not all, orthodontic problems.

Ligation: The process of attaching an archwire to the brackets on your teeth

Panoramic X-ray: An x-ray that rotates around your head to take pictures of your teeth, jaw, and other facial areas.

How do I know if I need orthodontic treatment?

Many patients find out that they need orthodontic treatment through their oral healthcare providers. However, you can look for the signs yourself too! These include:

Overbite (upper teeth protruding in front of lower teeth)

Bucked teeth

Underbite (lower teeth protruding in front of upper teeth)

Spaced out teeth

TMJ pain

Open space between teeth when biting down (open bite)

Problems with chewing

Crowded or overlapping teeth

What’s the best age for my child to begin orthodontic treatment?

Orthodontics can successfully change smiles at any age, but we do find that certain types of problems respond best when treated while the jaw is still growing. We recommend that your child visit an orthodontist around the age of seven even if no problems have been detected so far. This allows us to perform a thorough exam and give your child a complete diagnosis for optimal treatment planning.

Orthodontics is the area of dentistry concerned with...

Orthodontics is the area of dentistry concerned with the supervision, guidance and correction of the dentofacial structures. Orthodontic treatment uses braces, retainers and other appliances to correct any dentofacial abnormalities. Regular dental check-ups and orthodontic treatment are proven to be effective tools in helping establish and maintain good oral health for people of all ages. Braces can be beneficial to both children and adults. Orthodontic treatment will result in a beautiful smile that will impact your self confidence for years to come.

Who should wear braces?

Braces may be worn by both children and adults, not only to improve the attractiveness of their smile, but also because braces correct improper alignment of teeth that can lead to gum disease and early tooth loss. Left untreated, crooked teeth with irregular spacing make cleaning harder and allow cavities to more easily develop. Properly aligned teeth also make it easier to chew all types of food, and eliminate the headaches and pain caused by uneven chewing. Uneven teeth may result in weak enamel, gum problems and jaw misalignment. Modern technology has resulted in numerous options of braces that will fit your specific lifestyle and will provide you more comfort during treatment.

How will braces straighten my teeth?

Braces exert a gentle pressure on teeth over time to straighten them. The two main components include the braces placed on the teeth and the arch wire that connects them. The brace is a specially-shaped metal or ceramic affixed to each tooth and the arch wire is bent to reflect the bite that the patient should have after treatment. The wire threads through the braces. As the wire tries to return to its original shape, it applies pressure to move the teeth.

Braces for Children

Many children are ambivalent about getting braces.  On the one hand, they like the idea of perfect teeth, but on the other hand they are nervous about whether the braces will cause pain and discomfort.  The good news is that the placement of orthodontic braces is not at all painful, and the end result will be a beautiful straight smile.

Although patients of any age can benefit from orthodontic braces, they tend to work much quicker on pre-teens and teenagers since they are still experiencing jaw growth.  An orthodontic examination may be beneficial before age seven if facial or oral irregularities are noted.

What Causes misalignment of teeth?

Poorly aligned teeth often cause problems speaking, biting and chewing.  Most irregularities are genetic or occur as a result of developmental issues.  Conversely, some irregularities are acquired or greatly exacerbated by certain habits and behaviors such as:

Mouth breathing

Thumb or finger sucking

Prolonged pacifier use

Poor oral hygiene

Poor nutrition

The main types of orthodontic appliances used for children:

Fixed braces - Braces comprised of brackets which are affixed to each individual tooth, and an archwire which connect the brackets.  The brackets are usually made of metal, ceramic, or a clear synthetic material which is less noticeable to the naked eye.  After braces have been applied, the child will have regular appointments to have the braces adjusted by the orthodontist.  Orthodontic elastic bands are often added to the braces to aid in the movement of specific teeth.

Headgear - This type of appliance is most useful to treat developmental irregularities.  A headgear is a custom-made appliance attached to wire that is worn to aid in tooth movement.  A headgear is intended to be worn for 12-20 hours for each day and must be worn as recommended to achieve good results.

Retainers - Retainers are typically utilized in the third phase (retention phase).  When the original malocclusion has been treated with braces, it is essential that the teeth do not regress back to the original misalignment.  Wearing a retainer ensures the teeth maintain their proper alignment, and gives the jawbone around the teeth a chance to stabilize.

Braces for Adults

Orthodontic braces were historically associated with teenagers.  Today, an increasing number of adults are choosing to wear braces to straighten their teeth and correct malocclusions (bad bites).  In fact, it is now estimated that almost one third of all current orthodontic patients are adults.

Orthodontic braces are predictable, versatile and incredibly successful at realigning the teeth.  Braces work in the same way regardless of the age of the patient, but the treatment time is greatly reduced in patients who are still experiencing jaw growth and have not been affected by gum disease.  In short, an adult can experience the same beautiful end results as a teenager, but treatment often takes longer.

Can adults benefit from orthodontic braces?

Crooked or misaligned teeth look unsightly, which in many cases leads to poor self esteem and a lack of self confidence.  Aside from poor aesthetics, improperly aligned teeth can also cause difficulties biting, chewing and articulating clearly.  Generally speaking, orthodontists agree that straight teeth tend to be healthier teeth.

Straight teeth offer a multitude of health and dental benefits including:

Reduction in general tooth decay

Decreased likelihood of developing periodontal disease

Decreased likelihood of tooth injury

Reduction in digestive disorders

Fortunately, orthodontic braces have been adapted and modified to make them more convenient for adults.  There are now a wide range of fixed and removable orthodontic devices available, depending on the precise classification of the malocclusion.

The most common types of malocclusion are underbite (lower teeth protrude further than upper teeth), overbite (upper teeth protrude further than lower teeth) and overcrowding, where there is insufficient space on the arches to accommodate the full complement of adult teeth.

Prior to recommending specific orthodontic treatment, the orthodontist will recommend treatment of any pre-existing dental conditions such as gum disease, excess plaque and tooth decay.  Orthodontic braces can greatly exacerbate any or all of these conditions.

What are the main types of orthodontic braces?

The following are some of the most popular orthodontic braces:

Traditional braces - These braces are strong and tend not to stain the teeth.  They are comprised of individual brackets which are cemented to each tooth and accompanied by an archwire which constantly asserts gentle pressure on the teeth.  Traditional braces are generally metal but are also available in a clear synthetic material and “tooth colored” ceramic.  The ceramic brackets are generally more comfortable than the metal alternative, but can become discolored by coffee, wine, smoking and certain foods.

Invisalign® - Invisalign aligners are favored by many adults because they are both removable and invisible to onlookers.  Invisalign® aligners are clear trays, and should be worn for the recommended amount of time each day for the quickest results.  Invisalign® aligners are more comfortable and less obtrusive than traditional braces, but also tend to be more costly.  Not all patients are candidates for Invisalign®.

Lingual braces - These appliances are usually metal and fixed on the tongue side of the teeth, therefore not seen when a patient smiles.  Lingual braces tend to be moderately expensive and in some cases, can interfere with normal speech.

What is MyClearBrace?

The latest trend in braces can now be found in Hungary. You don’t have to use the traditional appliances anymore, yet you can have a bright smile with an attractive set of teeth.

The idea of using braces creates disturbing images for many people. They envision painful treatments, irritation in their mouths, inconvenience, and difficulty in brushing their teeth.  Of course everybody would like to have a bright smile without all of this struggle.

MyClearBrace makes it possible for you to avoid all of these hassles.  Learn more about this revolutionary new solution.

Features of the MyClearBrace braces:

•          invisible braces

•          made of a special durable clear plastic

•          unlike the traditional appliances it contains no metal

•          uses 3D technology and computer modeling to provide a preview of the future results

Advantages of the MyClearBrace braces:

•          they’re virtually invisible when worn

•          comfortable and convenient

•          they’re made of soft yet sturdy plastic so they move teeth with much lighter forces than metal braces

•          they can be taken out while eating or brushing teeth

•          they can be easily removed whenever desired

How does it work?

The MyClearBrace system is prepared with computer modeling using a special 3D printing technology to provide a series of clear plastic caps (that replace traditional metal braces) precisely fitting the teeth. Each piece is made with gradual adjustments compared to the previous one. These modifications will move the teeth in the right direction and to the correct location.

Patients will wear the braces 20–22 hours a day, and will only remove them while eating or brushing their teeth. Since the adjustments are very small, normally the treatments will be painless. The MyClearBrace braces will immediately fit the teeth. It is also important that they are aesthetically pleasing since the clear plastic makes them virtually invisible.

Benefits of MyClearBrace:

•          aesthetically pleasing

•          comfortable

•          the treatment brings excellent results

 The treatment will normally last for 3–9 months (time may vary with different patients), depending on the initial condition of the patient’s teeth and on the desired results.  Patients have to wear the braces for 20–22 hours a day.

The Process of Treatment

 The first step is that you must schedule a consultation with an orthodontic specialist who will tell you if it is possible to use the MyClearBrace technology in your case.

If the answer is “Yes!” the orthodontic specialist will introduce you to the details of the treatment process, tell you how to use the braces, inform you how often you have to come to the office as well as provide you with other important information.

Next, we take some traditional diagnostic steps: making X-rays and taking precision impressions. The precision impression is used by the laboratory to prepare a dental mold. The dental mold is used to prepare a sample that is transmitted to computer with the help of a 3D imaging scanner. The perfect set of teeth for you will be designed in the laboratory with the help of special software, and under the supervision of the orthodontic specialist.

Based on these templates a series of unique, invisible braces will be prepared in the laboratory with the help of the 3D printing technology in order to gradually move the teeth to the desired locations. During the period of the treatment the orthodontic specialist will regularly check the movement of the teeth. When following the prescribed treatment the caps should be replaced every 1 or 2 weeks, as long as the desired movement of the teeth is being realized.

AFTER BRACES ALWAYS RETAINERS

Why retainers?

After your orthondontic treatment is finished, and your braces are removed, you will need retainers to hold your teeth in their new positions.

For how long do I need to wear retainers?

It takes time for the bone and all the tissues around your teeth to reorganise and therefore it is necessary to use retainers until your bite stabilises. In the first month after the braces are removed, the risk of relapse is very high.

Relapse means that the teeth can take up to one year or more to stabilize after treatment. If you had gaps between your teeth before treatment, the retention period will be longer.

Usually, retainers are worn for as long a time as you have had your braces. If your teeth move back to their original positions, you may need fixed braces again to correct them.

What Will My Retainers Look Like?

The retainers are individually designed to prevent teeth from reverting to their original positions. Retainers can take the form of a removable appliance or a fixed wire bonded at the back of your front teeth.

Do I have to Wear Them All the Time?

Your orthodontist will prescribe the retention plan that is best for you. Some retainers are used full-time for the first 6 months; after that, the retainers are worn only at night, for a few years. Other retainers are worn full-time for about a week, and solely at night thereafter. Fixed retainers are normally kept in place for 5 years.

Is it Important to Use Your Retainers as Instructed?

Removable retainers should be taken out during eating, contact sports and  when you brush your teeth. To clean the retainers, remove them first and brush them in tap water using a toothbrush and some toothpaste. Brush your teeth after this.

The safest place for your retainers is in your mouth. If you are not using the retainers they should always be kept in a box. There is a great risk of losing retainers if they are wrapped in tissue paper after you remove them from your mouth.

How Will Retainers Affect My Daily Life?

A removable retainer has a wire holding the front teeth. It will be visible but much less than the fixed braces.

If you have a removable retainer in your upper jaw, it will take you one to two days to get accustomed to them and speak properly. It is normal to experience a lot of saliva in your mouth with a new retainer.

Always bring the box to store your retainers to be kept  should you need to remove them. If you have a fixed retainer, you should spend more time to brush the back of your teeth. You have to brush all around the wire so that calculus will not form. You will be instructed on how to use dental floss with a floss-threader. Do remember not to use your front teeth to for biting hard foods or objects. Fixed retainers do not affect speech.

Will my teeth never change when the period of retention is over?

Bone has the capacity to change and remodel for as long as we live; that is why a broken bone can heal.

From 20 to 50 years of age, faces mature and teeth continue to push forward, causing crowding of the lower front teeth. This happens regardless of whether you have had wisdom teeth removed, extractions of teeth or previous orthodontic treatment for crowded teeth.

To avoid the risk of late crowding, removable retainers can be worn at night for a longer period and fixed retainers kept in for more than 5 years.

Adult patients usually sleep with their retainers on for the rest of their lives, if they want their teeth in perfect alignment.

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